Text Size:

A A A

Hearing FAQs

What is an Audiologist?

Audiologists are health-care professionals who evaluate, diagnose, treat, and manage hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance disorders. An Audiologist is a person who holds a minimum of a Masters degree in Audiology.

Hearing Aids in the Presence of Background Noise

Virtually all patients wearing hearing aids complain about background noise at one time or another. There is no way to completely eliminate background noise.

What is Digital Technology?

The term digital is used so often today, it can be confusing. When a hearing aid is termed digital, it generally means the hearing aid uses 100% digital processing. In other words, the hearing aid is indeed a complete computer.

Hearing Aid Battery Information

All batteries are toxic and dangerous if swallowed. Keep all batteries (and hearing aids) away from children and pets. If anyone swallows a battery it is a medical emergency and the individual needs to see a physician immediately.

How do I know if I have Hearing Loss?

Hearing loss is a natural part of the aging process. Hearing challenges can begin to present themselves based upon your hearing health history, including exposure to loud noise, certain medications, infections, head or ear trauma, congenital (birth or prenatal) or hereditary factors, as well as a number of other causes.

Realistic Expectations for the Hearing Aid User

Hearing aids work very well when fit and adjusted appropriately. They are designed to make words and the conversations easier to understand in all situations, without making sounds appear to be too loud.

Three Levels of Hearing Aid Technology

There are essentially three levels of hearing aid technology. We refer to these as analog, digitally programmable, and digital.

Medical Science Shows Insight into Noisy Eyeballs and Tinnitus

Tinnitus is an abnormal perception of a sound which is reported by patients that is unrelated to an external source of stimulation. Tinnitus is a very common disorder.

Type and Degree of Hearing Loss

Results of the audiometric evaluation are plotted on a chart called an audiogram. Loudness is plotted from top to bottom. Frequency, from low to high, is plotted from left to right.

Types of Hearing Aids

There are many styles of hearing aids. The degree of the hearing loss, power and options required, manual dexterity abilities, cost factors, and cosmetic concerns are some of the factors that will determine the style the patient will use.

Assistive Listening Devices (ALDs)

ALDs can increase the loudness of desired sounds, such as a radio, television, or a public speaker, without increasing the loudness of the background noises.

Candidates for ALDs

People with all degrees and types of hearing loss — even people with normal hearing can benefit from assistive listening devices.

Types of ALDs

There are many assistive listening devices available today, from sophisticated systems used in theaters and auditoriums to small personal systems.

The Prevalence of Tinnitus

Tinnitus is the term for the perception of sound when no external sound is present. It is often referred to as “ringing in the ears,” although some people hear hissing, roaring, whistling, chirping, or clicking.

Cause of Tinnitus

Tinnitus may originate from various lesions and from different sites. The auditory system involves highly complicated inner ear structures, many afferent and efferent nerve pathways and a great amount of nuclei that form a complex meshwork.

Cochlear Implants

Cochlear implants are a means of surgical amplification for patients with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. There is an internal and external device as part of the implant. Appropriately-identified adults and children with severe to profound hearing loss can be implanted starting as early as 12 months of age.

What is an Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)?

Auditory Processing (also called Central Auditory Processing) refers to the means by which we make sense of what we hear. Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) is a term for the variety of disorders that affect the way the brain processes information.

What is a Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD)?

Auditory Processing (also called Central Auditory Processing) refers to the means by which we make sense of what we hear. “Auditory Processing Disorders” refers to the abnormal interaction of hearing, neural transmission and the brain’s ability to make sense of sound.

Preparation for Balance Testing

This guide gives you an idea of what to expect on your test

Practical Suggestions for Persons with a Hearing Impairment

The ear is divided into three parts: an external ear, a middle ear and an inner ear. Each part performs an important function in the process of hearing.

A Discussion of Hearing Problems in Children

Five thousand children are born profoundly deaf each year in the United States alone. Another 10 to 15 percent of newborns have a partial hearing handicap.

A Discussion of Eustachian Tube and Middle Ear Problems

The ear is comprised of three portions: an outer ear (external), a middle ear and inner ear. Each part performs an important function in the process of hearing.

A Discussion of Dizziness

Dizziness is a symptom not a disease. It may be defined as a sensation of unsteadiness, imbalance, or disorientation in relation to an individual’s surroundings.

A Discussion of Chronic Ear Infections

Chronic ear infection is the result of an ear infection that has left a residual injury to the ear.

Hearing, Hearing Loss and Hearing Aids: Issues and Answers

Hearing loss occurs to most people as they age. Hearing loss can be due to the aging process, exposure to loud noise, certain medications, infections, head or ear trauma, congenital (birth or prenatal) or hereditary factors, diseases, as well as a number of other causes.

Aural Rehabilitation: Some Personal and Professional Reflections

When Geoff Plant asked me to give this keynote presentation, he said to be sure that I included some of my personal experiences as a hard of hearing person.

Hearing Aids: Reasonable Expectations for the Consumer

Since you are considering the purchase of hearing aids, it’s important for you to establish reasonable expectations from these highly sophisticated, miniature devices.

Managing Chronic Tinnitus As Phantom Auditory Pain

Patients experiencing severe chronic tinnitus have many characteristics in common with chronic pain patients.

1072_img1.gifAnother resource to provide you with access to many helpful hearing related articles.